Balance or steadiness does not come from taking easy roads, we know that. It comes from being able to remain balanced no matter our surroundings. But how do we master such a skill?

We are often taught then when we encounter a rock on the road, we need to take it away. That we need to remove that which could possibly shake our wagon, so that we can have a smooth passage. But does that really help us reach our purpose?

The moment we start focusing on the removal of a rock, bump or whatever it is that seems to trouble us, we often forget to keep our eyes on the road. Can you picture yourself driving an old wagon on a dusty road? Just you, a wagon and a horse in front of you. The wagon is shaking every now and then, which annoys you. The moment you bend forward and focus on what makes the wheels wiggle, you don’t see what’s in front of you anymore and are unable to direct the horse in the right direction. In the best case our attention is divided between the pebbles on the road and what’s in front of us, allowing us to keep the wagon from turning but driving in circles through weeds and dirt. In the worst we completely forget our destination, keep looking down and get tossed around by every bump we didn’t see coming.

Why do we have this tendency to take our eyes off the goal in front of us and focus on the little pebbles on the road instead?

Because we lack the confidence and trust in ourselves that we can navigate challenging paths, we aim to remove all pebbles that could possibly stand in our way. We try to eliminate challenges so that we don’t get shaken with what life throws at us. In doing this, we lose sight of what’s really in front of us and forget the bigger picture.

What makes us struggle is the idea that all roads should be smooth. Because we lack the confidence and trust in ourselves that we can navigate challenging paths, we aim to remove all pebbles that could possibly stand in our way.

Actually, it is lack of trust and confidence that also result in not having a clear vision or purpose. It is not so much that we don’t know where we really want to go, but that we don’t want to see it because we think we cannot achieve it. Unconsciously, we feel as though it’s easier to remove little pebbles from the road than to take up the challenge of seeing the road through all the way to the end.

And so we tell ourselves that life should be easier and that we don’t need to struggle, but in reality we have nothing to struggle for. Because we have not acknowledged within ourselves a clear sight of destination we focus on making the ride being more comfortable. But deep down we know that this is never a real substitute meaning that comes from fighting for your purpose.

We think that our life should be easier and that we don’t need to struggle, but in reality we have nothing to struggle for.

Good thing we can learn to redirect our attention and navigate towards our purpose with balance and direction. Experience is a factor here, but don’t assume that it only comes in years. Experience is in reality the recognition; ‘I’ve seen this before’, which takes your immediate attention away from the little-pebble-thinking and towards yourself. By recognizing that we have encountered, endured and survived something similar before, our confidence increases. We can do it again. For a moment, even if it’s only a little, we can relax and see the bigger picture. That’s where we learn to aim for our goals again.

Experience is in reality the recognition; ‘I’ve seen this before’, which brings your immediate attention of the situation and on yourself.

The moment we recognize we are too close to the rock, we’ve taken the first step in redirecting our attention back to the road in front of us. We are no longer caught up in removing pebbles but become able to move our hips along to the beat of the rocking wagon. A stone under the right front wheel might cause the cart to go up, but when we lean from our core towards that side, our head can remain straight.

Each time this happens it becomes easier. We learn to see with the eyes of a wise owl*; by looking inside we can fly above the pebbles in our own mind and move with balance towards our home.

*Did you know that the owl is one of the three archetypical animals that represent the manpower-model?

Happy travels,

Tobias

Tobias Mol

About Tobias Mol

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